TASC and the Republic of Georgia



TASC inventory of Georgia's religious dedications

Perched on a mountain top overlooking Mtskheta, the ancient capital of Georgia, is this chapel of St Nino, said to have been first built between 585 and 604, possibly the earliest surviving church in Georgia. For more pictures of Mtskheta, click here, and and here for a University of Heidelburg site.

The British Academy is funding a three-year project to build a TASC inventory of the religious dedications of Georgia. This is the first joint project between the British Academy and its counterpart in Georgia, the Academy of Sciences. The project involves reciprocal visits: in 2003 the Director of TASC, Dr Graham Jones, spent a month in Tbilisi and the eastern region, Kharketi, initiating the first season of fieldwork with Georgian colleagues.

The first part of the dataset is under construction: Click on Georgian Dedications. Click here to view the Dataset Sources. Photographs of churches and devotional furnishings from the first season of fieldwork are also being made available.


'Sacred Places of Georgia'

TASC is also associated with the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Georgia in consultations regarding the development of a GIS-based survey, 'Sacred Places of Georgia', initiated by the Commission for Historical Sources. The cartographer and GIS expert colleague is George Beruchashvili, a doctoral student in the Department of Geography, State University of Tbilisi.

Larger-scale sections of this early draft of the 'Sacred Places of Georgia' map can be accessed by clicking on the names of the country's dioceses, listed below (in roughly geographical order, from the east of the country to the west).

These can be compared with maps of the country's administrative districts published by Georgia's parliament, and with a map of administrative regions (rayons) available on the web-site of the National Democratic Institute. The NDI site also exists to provide lists (and at a minimum the number) of city, town, and village councils in each region.

East of the central watershed that divides Georgia into western and eastern topographical regions:

Dioceses located in the basins of the rivers Alazani and Iori

Bodbe
Nekresi
Kvareli
Alaverdi
Tsilkani
Gurjani
Sagarejo

Dioceses located in the basins of the rivers Mtkvari and Didi and the west bank of the Aragvi

Mtskheta
Tbilisi
Rustavi
Manglisi
Tsalka
Bolnisi
Dmanisi
Gori
Samtavisi
Khashuri
Urbnisi
Ruisi
Niqozi
Tskhinvali
Borjomi
Akhaltsikhe

West of the central watershed:

Batumi
Skhalta
Ozurgeti
Shemoqmedi
Bagdati
Zestafoni
Chiatura
Gelati
Kutaisi
Nikortsminda
Poti
Zugdidi
Tsaishi
Martvili
Mestia
Tsageri
Sokhumi
Akhali Athoni

'Sacred Sites of Georgia', like TASC, is an associate project of the Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative.


Useful links for Georgian Studies

Heritage and Culture Association is a non-governmental body concerned with recording and conservation of Georgia's material and other heritage.

A large number of useful links to web-sites concerning Georgia can be found at WWW Georgia Virtual Library, compiled by scholars at the University of Tennessee, Office of Research.

An introduction to Georgian script and access to free Georgian fonts can be found at Omniglot.

Teach Yourself Georgian on-line.

GeorgiaNet is a compendious collection of Georgian resources on the Internet.

C. Wichert, a teacher living near Freiburg in Germany, has compiled a page with useful links, including sites with Georgian fonts and Georgian news services.

Armazi is a web-site with a section devoted to things Georgian, and compiled by P. J. Hillery of Edinburgh.

Sakartvelo is billed as ‘an attempt to create an online portrait of the Country of Georgia, also called Sakartvelo, using all online resources that are related to this country and are currently available on the World Wide Web’.

Kavkazia, Resources for Georgian matters compiled by Kavkazia (meaning 'Caucasus'), a trio of American singers performing traditional vocal music of the region.

Rustavi 2 news service has an English version.

Sites with photography of Georgian churches and related cultural sites

Georgian Churches photographed by American traveller Galen Fryslinger - with links to photographs of Tbilisi and some of the Gerogian provinces.




The icon of St Nino at Mtskheta. St Nino is revered as the evangelist of the Kartveli kingdom.


TASC's Director, Graham Jones, took part in the International Conference on Georgian Historical Sources, organised in October 2002 by the Georgian Academy of Sciences, Commission for Historical Sources. Other participants included Wim Lucassen of the Bagration-stichting, Amsterdam, Georgisch Cultureel-Wetenschappelijk Centrum in Nederland, which publishes the journal Georgica whose Issue No. 4 is shown here.


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Last updated: 13 October 2005 22:35
Dr G.R. Jones
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